Author: CHB

Memorial to revolutionaries sets new boundaries

Project overview Jiangshan City in Zhejiang Province of China is a “red” and heroic land where many revolutionaries sacrificed their lives to fight for the liberty of the nation and the people. In order to remember the history and revolutionary martyrs as well as take warning for the future, the local government decided to build the Jiangshan Martyrs Memorial Hall. Located on the south end of a mountain park, the project is adjacent to Xishan Road and urban area on the east, Xishan Park on the north, and the already-existed public cemetery on south and west sides. The north-south...

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Meck Architekten designs asymmetric ceramic-clad church in Poing

The church of Seliger Pater Rupert Mayer in the town of Poing, near Munich in Germany, is topped with a ceramic crown clad with 15,000 white, three-dimensional tiles. Munich studio Meck Architekten designed the rectangular church, which can accommodate 220 worshipers, to be a landmark in the growing town. The church dedicated to a German priest named Rupert Mayer, who was a leading figure in the Catholic resistance to the Nazis in Munich, has two visually distinct elements. Its single-storey base is made of grey stone blocks constructed from molasse – a type gravel that is found in the region, while the sculptural roof is...

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Only remaining UK semaphore tower saved

The Semaphore Tower on Chatley Heath in Surrey is the only surviving semaphore tower in Britain. Complete with a working semaphore mast, it is a unique remnant from the Napoleonic era. The Grade II* tower was once a vital link in a signalling chain that transmitted messages in just a few minutes from Admiralty House in London to Portsmouth Docks. Now sadly it has fallen into disrepair, with water seeping into its fine brickwork. The water ingress has reached a critical point , threatening the mast’s stability and the tower’s structural integrity. Now, thanks to the generosity of over 1,000 Landmark Trust supporters,...

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Feng shui and the art of avoiding catastrophes in urban planning

The bustling Hong Kong skyline evokes many responses. The city has the world’s greatest concentration of skyscrapers, and its spectacular nightly 8pm light show ensures that visiting tourists rank it as one of the greatest skylines in the world. In the cold light of day Hong Kong’s architecture is much like that of any modern, densely-populated city – vertical, compressed and, beneath the multitude of facades, predominantly utilitarian. Look at the buildings closest to the waterfront, and you’ll notice that they are full of holes, great gaping holes in their midriffs that make many of the structures look like...

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Remembering D-Day – Second World War Sites Given Protection

To mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day, six Second World War concrete structures built as replica landing craft for training, nine sunken army tanks, two armoured bulldozers and components of Mulberry floating harbours in Dorset, Devon and West Sussex are being granted protection by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on the advice of Historic England. D-Day on 6th June 1944, codenamed Operation Overlord, was the greatest combined land air and naval operation in history. It was a massive assault by the allies to invade Nazi-occupied Western Europe during the Second World War. 156,000 soldiers from Britain,...

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