Author: CHB

A lost monastery, and stolen plane parts, by Joseph Kelly, Editor

It looks like a typical picture postcard scene from a British Winter. On a cold November day the River Dee rushes down from Snowdonia, heading busily seaward through the arches of the famous seventeenth century bridge at Bangor Is-y-coed. Built around 1660, almost certainly by Inigo Jones, the charming but extremely narrow structure boasts five arches, each with parapets allowing for triangular shelters for foot passengers. Whilst perfectly adequate for horse-drawn vehicles, farm carts and pedestrians, the coming of the motor car put phenomenal strains on this little bridge, which had been in need of constant repair for centuries....

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Concern over delays to Cadet Chapel, Colorado works

The landmark Cadet Chapel that towers over the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado is suffering from serious leaks and corrosion, so the school has drawn up the most ambitious restoration project in the building’s 55-year history. However, the project has stalled badly, as officials have been unable to settle on a contractor for the long and complicated project. Water has been seeping through seams in the chapel’s aluminum skin for years, said Duane Boyle, the academy’s campus architect. Repeated applications of caulk to seal the seams have contaminated and degraded the metal. “We had to make a serious...

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Newlyn tidal observatory amongst over 900 new listings in 2018

A prehistoric settlement, hangar buildings and a series of Robin Hood sculptures were among the more unusual heritage places gaining listed status during 2018. Government heritage agency Historic England said there were 924 new listed buildings and structures, including 638 war memorials to mark the centenary of the end of the first world war. Joining the list was the Tidal Observatory at Newlyn, Cornwall. The observatory was one of three constructed at the request of Ordnance Survey between 1915 ans 1921 to establish mean sea level, and was listed “for the contribution of more than 100 years of tidal data to...

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Architect in campaign to save iconic retail store

A leading architect in the UK city of Derby is leading a campaign to stop his local council from demolishing an iconic local retail landmark. Derek Latham, who is also chair of both Derbyshire Historic Buildings Trust and the Derwent Valley Trust, is trying to stop an application by Derby City Council to demolish the former Debenhams building in Victoria Street. A letter of objection has also been submitted to the council by Derby Civic Society, which aims to promote high standards of planning in the city. In the 1960s, the store known then as Ranby’s, was a popular destination for...

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Light Installation Brings History to Life at Shrewsbury Flaxmill Maltings

A new light installation has gone on display at the world’s oldest iron-framed building, the Grade I listed Main Mill at Shrewsbury Flaxmill Maltings. Visible from the street, ‘As Shadows Return’ uses silhouettes behind the windows to show workers and machinery inside the mill. Dating back to 1797, the building operated as a flax mill until 1886 and then as a maltings from 1897 to 1987. It was also a temporary barracks during the Second World War. Its iron frame was truly pioneering, the work of British engineers who were determined to overcome the problem of timber-framed mills and...

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