Author: CHB

Synagogue in Sadhora, Ukraine rededicated after being rebuilt and renovated

The famous synagogue and rabbi’s residence in Sadhora (Sadagora) Ukraine, near Chernivtsi, has been rededicated after more than three years of reconstruction and renovation work. The huge, Moorish-style synagogue, with turrets, towers and big arched windows, was where one of the most flamboyant Hasidic dynasties held court in the 19th century. It was built by Rabbi Abraham Jacob Friedmann, who succeeded his father Rebbe Israel Friedman, the founder of the dynasty, and continued the opulent court. For decades under the Soviets it housed a machine shop for collective farms, and later stood derelict. Hundreds of Hassidim came to Sadhora...

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NYC 168th Street subway station renovation reveals historic details

When you Google the 168th Street Station, one of the top results is “168th street station creepy” and there’s a good reason for that. The Washington Heights station, where the 1 train stops, has been pretty decrepit for years. It was built as a grand station of the IRT subway, the first line in the city, with a tiled tunnel arch and vintage lanterns, it was badly in need of renovation. The exciting news is that the renovation is well underway and you can finally see some of the grandeur peeking through now that the ceiling is done. The...

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Garden Cities (Shire Library), Paperback, by Sarah Rutherford (Author)

The Garden City Movement provided a radical new model for the design and layout of housing at the turn of the nineteenth century and set standards for the twentieth century which were of international significance. The vision of the movement’s founder, Ebenezer Howard, drew on many strands of political and utopian thought, and initially aimed at addressing the problems of an increasingly urban and dysfunctional society along ‘the peaceful path to real reform’. It took only five years, from 1898 to 1903 for the idea to take root in the open fields of North Hertfordshire, when Earl Grey proclaimed...

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England’s Post-War Listed Buildings by Elain Harwood (Author), James O. Davies (Author)

England’s Post-War Listed Buildings is a comprehensive and stylish guide to over 500 of the country’s most striking, and historically relevant, architectural gems. Listed buildings range from traditional works by Raymond Erith and Donald McMorran and many of the ‘pop icons’ of the 1960s (including Centre Point), to internationally outstanding modern works like Stirling and Gowan’s Leicester Engineering Building and Foster Associates’ offices for Willis Faber Dumas in Ipswich. This fully updated and expanded edition from Elain Harwood, one of the foremost names in modern architecture writing, contains numerous new entries arranged in an accessible, regional structure, as well...

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California Mission Landscapes: Race, Memory, and the Politics of Heritage (Architecture, Landscape, and American Cu, by Elizabeth Kryder-Reid (Author)

Nothing defines California and our nation s heritage as significantly or emotionally, says the California Mission Foundation, as do the twenty-one missions that were founded along the coast from San Diego to Sonoma. Indeed, the missions collectively represent the state s most iconic tourist destinations and are touchstones for interpreting its history. Elementary school students today still make model missions evoking the romanticized versions of the 1930s. Does it occur to them or to the tourists that the missions have a dark history? California Mission Landscapes is an unprecedented and fascinating history of California mission landscapes from colonial outposts...

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